Shooting at Artificial Running Targets
corner, hunting knives, hunting knife, hunting home, hunting knives, hunting knife, hunting support, hunting knives, hunting knife, hunting Warranties, hunting knives, hunting knife, hunting Trophy Room, hunting knives, hunting knife, hunting Hunting Articles, hunting knives, hunting knife, hunting Wild Game Recipes, hunting knives, hunting knife, hunting menu-filler,hunting knives, hunting knife, hunting Hunting Knife Shopping Cart top-menuRow1xCol10.gif menu-right-corner,


BBB A+ Rating

Shooting at Artificial Running Targets

Shooting at Artificial Running Targets




      

Shooting at Artificial Running Targets


Shooting at Artificial Running Targets

Coming down to our artificial running target, and shooting at the accepted range for this work, 100 yards, when the mark is traveling at the rate of 10 feet per second the lead should be 1.16 feet; 20 feet per second, 2.32; 30 feet per second, 3.48; 40 feet per second, 4.64; 50 feet per second, 5.80; 60 feet per second, 9.96. These calculations are made for the Government rifle with a muzzle velocity of 2,700 feet; ordinary sporting weapons would require considerable more allowance. Moreover if a man were slow on the trigger or dwelt on his aim the Lord knows how far ahead he would have to hold. These figures are for the fiftieth of a second for pulling and time out of the barrel, and that is pretty fast.

The English style of running deer shooting is to fire two shots, a right and left, while the mark is traveling about sixty feet, at thirty feet a second. The number of shots we might fire would naturally be limited by the velocity of the mark. The character of weapon we used would have its influence, too. At the given rate of speed and distance under fire, an automatic ought to get in three shots, a lever-action rifle two, but I doubt if the average rifleman with a bolt gun could do better than fire the one shot.

This is not a treatise on deer shooting, yet a word on the subject. A buck at full speed, especially when first sprung, bounds high. It will not do to attempt to hit him while he is rising or even at the height of his leap; hold low and in front, about where he will alight, for he always seems to remain at this point for the greatest length of time. Even when the animal is running straight away hold rather low—his apparent line of "flight " invariably appears to be higher than it really is, what impresses the eye being the top of his bounds where he is in plainest view.

Askins, Charles. Rifles and Rifle Shooting. New York: Outing, 1912. Print.

Are you aware that Google is offering +1 to Everyone? Share your +1 with Every One of Your Friends by looking for the +1 on websites everywhere!"




If you liked this site, click



Hunting Knives - Hunting Knife






Hunting Knives



Privacy Policy by TRUSTe





HuntingBlades.com is Secure

Order Online 24 Hours a Day, 7 Days a Week, 365 Days a Year


Online Since 2004




9" Fillet Knife - Clam


Kit of 3 Mini Dmnd Whetstone/Shth


Mini-Alpha Hunter Drop point


Elite Skinner II G-10 Skinner




Security


Privacy


Hassle Free Returns


Frequently Asked Questions