THE PUMP-ACTION REPEATER AND THE MILITARY BOLT-ACTION
corner, hunting knives, hunting knife, hunting home, hunting knives, hunting knife, hunting support, hunting knives, hunting knife, hunting Warranties, hunting knives, hunting knife, hunting Trophy Room, hunting knives, hunting knife, hunting Hunting Articles, hunting knives, hunting knife, hunting Wild Game Recipes, hunting knives, hunting knife, hunting menu-filler,hunting knives, hunting knife, hunting Hunting Knife Shopping Cart top-menuRow1xCol10.gif menu-right-corner,


BBB A+ Rating

THE PUMP-ACTION REPEATER AND THE MILITARY BOLT-ACTION

THE PUMP-ACTION REPEATER AND THE MILITARY BOLT-ACTION




      

THE PUMP-ACTION REPEATER AND THE MILITARY BOLT-ACTION


THE PUMP-ACTION REPEATER AND THE MILITARY BOLT-ACTION

The mechanism of the pump-action is the same as that of the well-known repeating shotgun—a sliding forearm that ejects and reloads by means of a straight pull back and forth. Formerly this type of hunting rifle was chambered for many sizes of hunting cartridges, but in a day when hand reloaded ammunition was common, with the expanded and tight shells that followed as a matter of course, the straight pull lacked leverage in ejecting and reloading. For this reason, with the exception of the Standard rifle and the Marlin, manufacturers have been content to make the pump action arms in .22 caliber only. The Marlin Company is building a rifle in .25-20 and the Standard has gone still farther in turning out weapons in calibers from .25 to .35 high power with this action. Pump-action rifles are generally built in light weight, from four and a half to six pounds, and are therefore, not especially designed for range and gallery, though very accurate and capable of making good scores. Its light weight, balance, rapidity, and general handiness make it the chosen weapon of the rifle snapshot, the man who prefers to use his weapon shotgun fashion, striking his mark while it is in motion. For small game, too, and as a companionable outdoor piece it is a prime favorite. The Colt Fire Arms Company was the pioneer in pump-action rifles, but has long since given up their manufacture. There might be a reason for this other than any inherent defect in the arms since that firm is very completely occupied in turning out revolvers and automatic pistols, nevertheless the impression remains that the action was not a success where large game and heavy cartridges were concerned. The Colt rifles were deceptive in this way: Try out one in a gun store or upon the range and it appeared to work perfectly, but in practical service, in game shooting, the owner would be balked by it every now and then at a critical moment. The trouble is partly the inability to make a human being into a good working machine; under excitement he does things hurriedly and ineffectively, or what he then accomplishes must be of a very simple nature. I have never yet seen a man with a pump-action gun, either rifle or shotgun, that was not balked by it occasionally. This matters nothing with small game, only one opportunity gone in a large number, but with big game that one lost chance might utterly spoil an outing. Of course with dangerous beasts it would be foolhardy to select a weapon that could jam or balk. Notwithstanding this, I am inclined to believe that using the clean, smokeless powder ammunition, and never attempting to reload a cartridge, the mechanism would be quite satisfactory with certain high power loads, like the .25-35 and .3030, certainly it works perfectly in calibers up to .25-20. The whole question is merely one of leverage, for the action is faster than that of any other hand-operated repeating rifle. If equally reliable, it would be chosen in preference to the lever or the bolt-action. It is simpler than an automatic, has cleaner lines, can be made lighter in weight, and in the hands of an expert is rapid enough for any practical purpose, but it is a question if it can ever be made non-balkable. On the whole, in these days of rapidly developing auto-loaders and increasing power and breech pressure, we may fairly conclude that the pump-action will always be limited to small game and miniature cartridges.

Askins, Charles. Rifles and Rifle Shooting. New York: Outing, 1912. Print.

Are you aware that Google is offering +1 to Everyone? Share your +1 with Every One of Your Friends by looking for the +1 on websites everywhere!"




If you liked this site, click



Hunting Knives - Hunting Knife






Hunting Knives



Privacy Policy by TRUSTe





HuntingBlades.com is Secure

Order Online 24 Hours a Day, 7 Days a Week, 365 Days a Year


Online Since 2004




9" Fillet Knife - Clam


Kit of 3 Mini Dmnd Whetstone/Shth


Mini-Alpha Hunter Drop point


Elite Skinner II G-10 Skinner




Security


Privacy


Hassle Free Returns


Frequently Asked Questions