PALM-REST
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PALM-REST

PALM-REST




      

PALM-REST


PALM-REST

The palm-rest is the Winchester, and is adjustable for length and angle without the use of tools; some prefer it fixed more toward the frame and others forward. The palm-rest is something that American riflemen once fought bitterly and consistently, rigidly barring it from their matches. Nevertheless they beat the devil around a stump by getting the effect of the palm-rest through balancing the rifle on the end of the thumb and the finger tips—some marksmen shoot in that position yet. This manner of holding is hard on the fingers when the piece is heavy, and otherwise is inferior to the handhold.

The palm-rest serves the double object of permitting the elbow to rest on the hip without unduly contorting the body, also preventing the hand from gripping the barrel which is inimical to evenness of elevation. It is difficult to grip a barrel with exactly the same force every time; the clasp of the hand may tighten or loosen and the contracting fingers of one hand have an effect on the other, causing irregularity of trigger pulling. All this, it might be noted, applies equally to other rifles as well as the Schuetzen, but a degree of accuracy which would be considered satisfactory with a hunting weapon would not rate as third class work with the match rifle. Delicately set Schuetzen triggers can only be used advantageously where the rifle is balanced rather than held, either on the finger tips or palm-rest.

The palm-rest is now in general use by American and German riflemen alike. The man who possessed none would be badly handicapped in a long series of shots, whatever his skill might be. It is not a handsome contrivance, but of its utility there can be no question; rifles weighing above fifteen pounds could hardly be shot effectively without it.

Askins, Charles. Rifles and Rifle Shooting. New York: Outing, 1912. Print.

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