Dealing with the Drag of the Water on the Dry Fly
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Dealing with the Drag of the Water on the Dry Fly

Dealing with the Drag of the Water on the Dry Fly




      

Dealing with the Drag of the Water on the Dry Fly


Dealing with the Drag of the Water on the Dry Fly

"Drag is very difficult to overcome under some conditions; it is caused by the stream running faster in some parts than in others; for instance, if one is casting across a river, and the water in the center is running faster than at the side on which the fly falls, the pull of the current on the line tends to draw the fly faster than the water around it, and this sets up 'positive drag.' If, on the other hand, owing to the conformation of the stream, the water is running more rapidly at the side where the fly falls than it is in the center where the line falls, then the line will hold back the fly and set up drag of another kindó'negative drag.'

"If all these various difficulties are overcome, and if the fly happens to appeal to the fish as a suitable morsel, it is taken, often with a great show of confidence. The subsequent proceedings are exciting, but are, of course, quite familiar. . . . The conditions that are most favorable to dry-fly fishing are, first of all, that the surface of the water should be smooth enough to enable the fly to float and to enable the angler to see it; secondly, that the fish be actually feeding, obviously on some floating insect. Under these conditions I believe the dry-fly will kill fish on any river; but of course in rapid streams, where the surface is broken up by rocks and the current is strong, the conditions are undoubtedly entirely against the dry-fly fisherman.

"The great attraction of dry-fly fishing is the actual seeing of the individual fish, the stalking for him, and his ultimate capture; in fact, you see the whole performance and fish consciously for one individual trout, whereas in the wet-fly system (which, of course, is also largely used in England), one casts simply into a likely piece of water and hopes for the best. . . ."

In addition to the above it remains only to be said that to use the dry-fly method it is not absolutely imperative to cast to a visibly rising fish, for if he chooses the angler may fish all the water as in wet-fly fishing. It should also be noted that while the majority of dry-flies used in England are close imitations of the insect life of the streams other flies which are sometimes used successfully are not exact imitations but rather of the sort known as "fancy."

Camp, Samuel Granger. The Fine Art of Fishing. New York: Outing Pub., 1911. Print.

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